Invest in yourself

One of the “new rules”, investing in yourself simply means diversifying your portfolio.

Lawyers regularly or semi-regularly put money in various assets classes.  Retirement funds holding stocks and bonds.  Maybe real estate.  Maybe a friend’s speculative tech startup.  CD’s.

Depending on our risk threshold, we hope for a return on, and preservation of, this capital.

If you have been successful and have a small nest egg, use this to finance your own personal development.  Leave the law and live off savings as you create the time to find out what is your passion and simply explore.

If the current paycheck is necessary to keep the lights on, stretch a bit and take a portion to hire a coach or mentor or someone else to find your passion and explore other opportunities . . . while you keep your day job.

Invest for a return on yourself.

Continue Reading

Enough money

It’s a great feeling be able to comfortably afford (receive a paycheck) your and your family’s lifestyle.

It’s also a great feeling to take (save) the money and run.

Many do not pencil out how much money they actually need to provide a comfort level to leave the law:  12 months.  24 months.  36 months.

Until the unhappy lawyer sits down and thinks through this calculation, he or she will keep doing what they are doing, and keep getting what they are getting.

Continue Reading

The value in what you don’t like

Finding and monetizing your unique genius – that something that you are so good at, that comes so natural to you that you don’t even think of it as a skill – can take a long time and is a constant cycle of refinement and analysis.
 
It can be daunting and frustrating to find your “passion”.  It is not easy.  Everyone else seems to have one.  It always seems to be changing on you.  It’s murky.  And it requires some personal therapy that can be scary.
 
It can be easier to identify what your passions are not.  It’s sometime easier and a good first step to just be able to confidently say “I don’t like this” or “I just kinda like it” or “it’s okay, I guess” or “yeah, whatever”. 
 
What you don’t like can be your guide to what you do.

Continue Reading