The Unhappy Attorney’s Anthem

A reader sent in this link of what I’m calling the “song of the year” for us unhappy attorneys considering leaving the law.

It’s from the show “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend”, which details the adventures of an anxiety and depression suffering real-estate lawyer who panics when her top New York City law firm offers her partnership and instead relocates to Southern California.

Click below to watch and listen.

 

 

If these lyrics resonated with you, and you want to leave the law, then talk to me to learn more about the Leave Law Behind Program. Schedule a free consult call with me directly and we can see if it’s a fit for you. Click here to sign up and schedule a time.

Continue Reading

How I Stopped Feeling Like a Fraud

You may suffer from “imposter syndrome” as an attorney, and feel like you do not know what you are doing day to day.

But there is a way to stop this. Here’s how …

 

 

Click here to schedule a strategic call with me, Casey Berman, founder of Leave Law Behind. I will get on the phone directly with you and give you that start you need to leave the law. I will take you through the steps you need to know right now to leave your legal practice. Wouldn’t it feel great to just align with the job, feel like you’re really doing something that you know how to do.

Video Transcript

Casey Berman, founder of Leave Law Behind and I am as always happy to be with you in this short video.

I want to talk to you today about something that I know I experienced as an attorney and you probably have experienced or likely experiencing it and that is feeling like a fraud.  Just feeling like a fraud as an attorney, just feeling like you don’t know what you’re doing which of course,

Continue Reading

Two Main Beliefs That Hinder Burnt Out and Unhappy Attorneys From Finding Alternative Careers

You’re exploring how to leave your legal practice and find an alternative career, but you are very likely hindered some blockers or obstacles or other issues.

Through all of the work we’ve done in helping people to leave the law, there are two main limiting beliefs likely getting in your way.

I shot the below short video to help you identify, unpack and overcome these two main beliefs that prevent unhappy attorneys like you from leaving the law and finding an alternative career.

I provide real life tips in this video to overcome these limiting beliefs, and discuss a real life story of how, even in the face of these fears, a Leave Law Behind Program member recently, successfully left the law.

The first belief that holds us back

Unhappy attorneys looking to leave the law often feel that there are not many non law, alternative jobs out there for attorneys. We lawyers looking to leave our law practice hold onto this belief that there is just a finite amount of alternative jobs and alternative careers out there for us.

The second belief that holds us back

There’s a second,

Continue Reading

Why you need to be selfish

There are lawyers out there who really care about the work they do, who find satisfaction and fulfillment in being an attorney, who enjoy reading and soaking up the finer points of the profession, and who find meaning in representing their clients.

You are not that type of person.

You went to law school and became a lawyer for any or all of a host of reasons: Because you wanted a stable job or because of the allure of being an attorney or because you thought you wanted to change the world or because your parents wanted you to go to law school or because you felt growing up that you always wanted to be a lawyer.

And looking back, these reasons might not have been the most critically thought out.

Or they were reasons driven by other people in your life, not you.

Or they were reasons that now do not align with your priorities.

And because of this, being a lawyer has begun to shape up for you as simply a job where you trade time for money. It’s become a job where helping clients or companies or institutions make (or save or protect) their money feels more and more shallow and stressful,

Continue Reading

That which kills your dream to leave the law

It’s required to be a perfectionist as a lawyer … when writing a brief or meeting a client deadline or ensuring your client complies with a law or regulation.

You can’t make a mistake.

But needing to be perfect is exactly what you don’t want to be when looking to leave the legal profession. It will slow down your courage, motivation, and soul.

Case in point: The below email exchange with a fellow Leave Law Behind reader who was interested in learning more about the Leave Law Behind Coaching Program, but ultimately passed for the time being:

 

_________________

Casey,

Thanks so much for reaching out. I’m still assessing and evaluating my situation and timing a bit, but didn’t want to leave you in limbo! I greatly appreciated talking to you and better understanding what you have to offer as I figure out my next steps.

And my response:

Sounds good, keep us posted how we can help.

And as far as “figuring out your next steps” … that can be a lot to ask,

Continue Reading

What Bilbo Baggins can teach us about leaving the law

I am a big fan of the J.R.R. Tolkien books.

I just re-read the classic “The Hobbit”, and it inspired me to shoot a short video about what the hero of the story, Bilbo Baggins, did time and time again … and how what he did is something we all need to do as we leave the law. Watch the video here. I hope you enjoy it.

 

 

 

 

 

Are you ready to leave the law? Are you really serious that now is the time for you to explore your dream career?

If so, you have found your tribe.

At Leave Law Behind, we have developed the proven process to find your dream career. Click here to find out how it can work for you.

 

Continue Reading

How not saying these two words can accelerate your dream career out of the law

I recently emailed with a fellow member of the Leave Law Behind Online Coaching Program who is at the exciting stage of identifying and then interviewing for careers out of the law.

She’s building momentum – some of these job descriptions are shaping up to be a fit with her Unique Genius … with her skills and strengths.

But as we reviewed many of these specific jobs, her fears and self-sabotage of the actual change required to leave the legal profession would still arise.

This manifested specifically through her saying “I don’t …“, as in:

  • I don’t think I want to do [“NON-LAW” JOB X] ”, or
  • “I don’t know much about [THIS ASPECT OF “NON-LAW” JOB X], so I guess I won’t pursue it” … and on and on.

Fear of change

Saying “I don’t” is a manifestation of our fear of change. It’s a way we think we protect ourselves from the unknown … but we are really just sabotaging our growth and development.

So she and I worked together on some new ways to re-phrase … or reposition … or rethink …

Continue Reading

What Suffering a Broken Foot Taught Me About Leaving the Law (Part I)

I broke my foot recently. Freak jogging accident. On crutches for four weeks, and then a walking boot for another four. But no surgery needed, and I’m healing well.

And while I can see my injured foot each time I look down, my recuperation has made me think of other injuries we suffer from, but cannot see that easily … many of which firmly get in the way of our path to leaving the law.

There’s a big revelation in the short video I shot this week, and it’s one that you absolutely need to consider and face as you explore leaving the law.

https://leavelawbehind.com/broken-foot-partI.

To your success,

Casey

Continue Reading

If you’re not happy as an attorney, then you’re likely this

We attorneys have been trained to be right.

Whether it’s in a contract negotiation, a trial, an interaction with a law firm partner or advising a client, we are trained to be right.

Doesn’t mean we always come out on top, but we sure do try.

Because being right is synonymous in our eyes with being strong and in control and admired and winning and valued and making it and success.

And that need to be right all of the time continues as we explore leaving the law.

But needing to be “right” as we leave the law can also be one of our biggest blockers to leaving. Because instead of being right about a fact or a point of law or a policy, we instead perpetuate being right about why we can’t or shouldn’t or won’t leave the law.

  • I know for near-certainty that I’m not worthy of a non-law job.
  • I’m sure I could never do the work of leaving the law.
  • I’m 99.9% positive I will never make in a non-law job the money I make now as an attorney.

Continue Reading

Why Justice Scalia wants you to leave the law

I was recently interviewed for a book about going to law school and the future of the legal profession in general.

The author sent me a draft copy to review and proof read for my sections.

And as I read more than just the sections in which she quoted me 🙂 I stumbled upon a fascinating 2009 quote from Justice Scalia that I wanted to share with you.

In response to a question about whether the quality of legal counsel appearing before the U.S. Supreme Court was too low, Scalia responded that he felt the opposite … and wondered aloud why so many bright minds were even entering the practice of law. Here’s what he said:

 

“I used to have just the opposite reaction. I used to be disappointed that so many of the best minds in the country were being devoted to this enterprise.

“I mean there’d be a … public defender from Podunk, you know, and this woman is really brilliant, you know. Why isn’t she out inventing the automobile or, you know, doing something productive for this society?

“I mean lawyers,

Continue Reading